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Sony Xperia T3 Successor Reportedly to be Revealed at MWC 2015

Back in January, the rumored Sony Xperia Z4 announcement1 at the Mobile World Congress taking place in the first week of March was cast into doubt. With Sony s conference less than a week away, it is almost certain that the manufacturer won t unveil a new device from it s Xperia Z-series. However, leaked documents might be hinting at an upcoming mid-range price Sony Xperia T3 Successor.

The phone with a model number E2303 appeared both on Geekbench2 and GFXBench3 earlier this week, as reported by TechRadar4, Rocking an octa-core 64-bit Snapdragon 615 processor, backed up by an Adreno 405 GPU and 2 GB of RAM, the supposed Sony Xperia T3 Successor will also feature a 12 MP rear camera and a 5 MP front facing one.

Running android lollipop, the device does stand out from it s predecessors, the device is not quite a flagship, being in the upper mid-range with a 5.2-inch display with a 720 x 1280 pixel resolution.

While the device is rumored to be a Sony Xperia T3 or Xperia C3 successor5, there is still a slight chance for it to be an entirely new smart device revealed by Sony.

However, having in mind its mid-range price specifications, it is definitely not the Xperia Z4.

With the Mobile World Congress 2015 taking place between the 2nd and 6th of March, it won t be long before all of our questions are answered.

For more Sony Xperia T3 and Tech Updates, Stay Tuned to JBG News!

References

  1. ^ the rumored Sony Xperia Z4 announcement (www.digitalspy.co.uk)
  2. ^ Geekbench (browser.primatelabs.com)
  3. ^ GFXBench (gfxbench.com)
  4. ^ TechRadar (www.techradar.com)
  5. ^ the device is rumored to be a Sony Xperia T3 or Xperia C3 successor (www.digitalspy.co.uk)

More than 500000 motorists are STILL driving while using their mobile phones …

  • More than 500,000 drivers still using mobile phones at wheel, study shows
  • At least one in 20 drivers aged under 30 have been caught flouting the law
  • Report said using hand-held device is more dangerous than drink or drugs
  • In 2013, mobile phone use behind the wheel was factor in 22 fatal collisions

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More than 500,000 motorists are still using their mobile phones while driving each day, according to shocking new figures.

And the number of phone-related crashes is rising despite dozens of deaths being caused each year by drivers using handheld devices.

Drivers aged under 30 are the biggest culprits with more than one in 20 (5.2 per cent) being caught flouting the law, the study found.

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More than 500,000 motorists are still using their mobile phones while driving each day, new Government figures reveal. Campaigners claim ministers should do more to impose tougher penalties (file picture, posed)

More than 500,000 motorists are still using their mobile phones while driving each day, new Government figures reveal. Campaigners claim ministers should do more to impose tougher penalties (file picture, posed)

The study found that mobile phone use while driving was most common among those aged between 17 and 29

The study found that mobile phone use while driving was most common among those aged between 17 and 29

The research revealed that using a handheld device is more distracting than alcohol or drugs, with drivers twice as likely to have their head down and eyes off the road while texting or using the internet.

Campaigners today urged ministers to impose tougher penalties and boost traffic police numbers, which have suffered a 23 per cent cut over the last five years.

Edmund King, AA president, said: ‘The only way to counter the addiction to mobiles is to have more cops in cars and for employers to take their duty of care more seriously.

If not they could face corporate manslaughter.’

He said a ‘hardcore’ number of drivers ‘still believe there is nothing wrong with their behaviour’ and are putting lives at risk.

Professor Stephen Glaister, director of the RAC Foundation, said the figures were ‘a worry’.

He added: ‘In 2013 the use of a mobile at the wheel was a factor in 22 fatal accidents and this is likely to be underreporting of the true figure.

‘Texting whilst driving impairs reactions more than being at the drink-drive limit.’

Some 1.6 per cent of Britain’s estimated 36million drivers were spotted using a handheld phone while at the wheel last year up on 1.4 per cent for a similar exercise carried out five years earlier in 2009.

Some two thirds of those observed breaking the law (1.1 per cent) last year had the phone in their hand rather than held to their ear suggesting that they were using it to text or check the internet.

The Government research found that men were more likely to use a mobile phone while behind the wheel

The Government research found that men were more likely to use a mobile phone while behind the wheel

Van drivers were deemed to be the worst offenders, followed by car drivers and lorry drivers, the figures show

Van drivers were deemed to be the worst offenders, followed by car drivers and lorry drivers, the figures show

Van drivers were found to be the worst offenders at nearly double the rate of offending (2.7 per cent) compared to car drivers (1.4 per cent) and lorry drivers (1.2 per cent).

The research found that the majority of van drivers were using the phone in their hand rather than holding it to their ear .

Men were found to be the most likely sex to use a hand-held phone while at the wheel for texting or speaking.

However, women were deemed to be those most likely to phone when stopped at traffic lights or in traffic jam.

Bus, coach and minibus drivers had the lowest rate of mobile phone use, with just 0.4 per cent seen using a hand-held phone at the wheel.

Drivers aged between 17-years-old and 29-years-old were found to be the most likely to use a hand held-phone, while those aged 60 or over were the least likely.

Drivers were more than twice as likely to use a mobile if driving alone (2.7 per cent) than if they had a passenger (1.2 per cent), the study found.

The new data shows that while there have been drops in mobile phone use following earlier crackdowns – such as new legislation and a 30 fine in 2004 and a higher 60 fine and three penalty points in 2007 that these were generally followed by a spike in usage.

The report noted that ‘after these immediate drops the proportion using a hand-held mobile phone increased again.’

The imposition in 2013 of the higher and current 100 fine plus points appears to have made no discernable difference and has failed to halt the rise.

Campaigners are urging ministers to impose tougher penalties and boost traffic police numbers across the UK

Campaigners are urging ministers to impose tougher penalties and boost traffic police numbers across the UK

The study tracked mobile phone while driving use between 2002 and 2014, noting drops after new legislation

The study tracked mobile phone while driving use between 2002 and 2014, noting drops after new legislation

The mobile phone research was carried out for the Department for Transport1 by the renowned Transport Research Laboratory (TRL) and is based on observations from 60 sites in England covering the South East, Manchester, Newcastle and Durham, and Norfolk, and 30 sites in Scotland.

David Davies, executive director of the respected Parliamentary Advisory Council for Transport Safety (PACTS) which advises MPs and ministers, said: ‘Today’s figures show a very large number of distracted drivers.

‘The 23 per cent reduction in roads police since 2010 cannot have helped’.

Mr Davies noted that the number of road deaths caused in a crash where the driver was using a mobile phone topped 26 in 2013.

There were also 95 serious injuries and 539 slight injuries, making 660 casualties overall.

Mr Davies added: ‘Concerns are growing over the increase in driver distractions. There is clear evidence that use of even a hands-free device reduces the driver’s ability to concentrate on the road.’

Neil Greig, director of policy and research at the Institute of Advanced motorists (IAM), said the main problem was that ‘drivers never believe they will be caught .

He said: ‘Mobile phone usage at the wheel can kill there’s no two ways about it.’

‘People must have the fear of being caught increased as we believe this is the only viable deterrent, but that needs an increase in visible policing.

The horrendous figures for van users show that fleets and companies must have clear and consistent mobile phone policies that are enforced.’

He said even legal hands-free phone use was problematical, adding: ‘Taking a call is still a major distraction.’

Transport Minister Robert Goodwill said: ‘No phone-call is worth risking an accident. That is why in 2013 we increased the penalty for people using a mobile phone at the wheel.

‘This research shows that the problem isn’t just drivers making phone calls, it is their use of phones to text or use the internet.

‘We will keep further deterrent measures under consideration.’

The number of road collisions in which mobile phones and texting have been contributory factors has soared by 21 per cent in just three years.

In the year to 2013 alone, fatal crashes in which mobile phones played a part rose by 5 from 17 to 22, an increase of nearly a third (29.4 per cent).

Overall crashes involving mobile phone use in the same 12-month period rose from 378 in 2012 to a new high of 422 in 2013 a rise of 44 or 11.6 per cent.

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More than 500,000 motorists are still using their mobile phones while driving each day, new Government figures reveal.</p>
<p>Campaigners claim ministers should do more to impose tougher penalties (file picture, posed)” width=”154″ height=”115″ /> ‘Cowshed Cinderella’ who said her sisters went partying while she stayed home to milk the cows wins 1.3million from her parents </a><a href=2

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References

  1. ^ Department for Transport (www.gov.uk)
  2. ^ ‘Cowshed Cinderella’ who said her sisters went partying while she stayed home to milk the cows wins 1.3million from her parents (www.dailymail.co.uk)

HTC One M9 in images: new Sense, camera UI and design

The cat is out of the bag: the official promotional video of the HTC One M91 has leaked out in its entirety, spoiling a lot of the excitement around the upcoming March 1st unveiling of the device that HTC has scheduled for MWC. This is the second year in a row that we’re seeing such a massive leak of HTC’s flagship before its official unveiling, and despite all of the companies efforts to keep the secret it seems that there are just too many holes to plug. You can still find the promotional HTC One M9 video up on the web2, but to save you watching and focus your attention on all the little details, we’re giving you a bunch of screenshots from the video showing the different new features of the M9.HTC has focused mostly on the camera experience in the One M9, as a large part of the video shows the awesome new photo editor, as well as the protruding (allegedly a 20-megapixel) main camera and the UltraPixel selfie cam.

You also get to see the largely unchanged industrial design that the company has adopted, as well as the little new touches in HTC Sense 7.0.

Take a look below, and let us know what you think: are you excited about the One M9?

HTC One M9


HTC One M9

References

  1. ^ HTC One (M9) (www.phonearena.com)
  2. ^ Commercial and promotional video for HTC One M9 both leak (www.phonearena.com)
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